1. 1) a. How do I cite something?

It depends on the citation style you are using. Most programs at Holland College use the APA style. A few, such as Fundamental Arts, use the MLA style. Check with your instructor or the library to find out what citation style that your course uses. The library citation FAQs deal mostly with APA style. The Charlottetown Centre library has pamphlets for both APA and MLA styles.

 

2. 1) b. How do I write citations and bibliographies in APA Style (6th Edition)?

NEW! Check out these APA formating videos

How to Format Your Paper in APA Style

Referencing Sources in APA Style: A Basic Introduction,

How to Reference Journal Articles 

How to Reference Multiple Authors in APA.

How to Reference a Citation Within a Citation in APA Style

How to Reference Newspaper Newsletter and Magazine Articles

How to Reference eBooks

How to Reference Books

How to Reference Websites

How to Reference Canadian Government Documents 

This content was created by Crystal Rose, Public Services Librarian, Memorial University Libraries, in partnership with the university's department of Distance Education, Learning
& Teaching Support.

Here are some other helpful YouTube videos:

3. 2) How do I cite an article from a database using the APA format?

In your References follow this format.

Author(s) of article. (Year of publication). Title of article. Title of Journal, Volume number(Issue number), page numbers

Example

Ruggless, R. (2008, May 19). Culinary Trails campaign aims to lead tourists back to Louisiana. Nation's Restaurant News, 42(20), 64-64. 

 
If you search for your article through the library website, then you can get the article citation from the "cite" link in the search results. You might have to ensure that the capilization is correct in the title according to APA.

If you paraphrased the work your in-text citation could be something like:

(Ruggless, 2008)

or

According to Ruggless (2008) ....

If are directly quoting something out of the work, then your in-text citation would also include the page number (or paragraph number) of the quotation and would look  something like:

(Ruggless, 2008, p. 64)

 

4. 3) How do I cite an article from a print journal using the APA format?

In your References follow this format.

Author(s) of article. (Year of publication). Title of article. Title of Journal, Volume number(Issue number), page numbers.

Example

Chadwick, C. & Valenzuela, S. (2008, July-August). Culture, change, and educational improvement.Educational Technology, 48(4), 27-36.

 

If you paraphrased the work your in-text citation could be something like:

(Chadwick & Valenzuela, 2008)

or

According to Chadwick and Valenzuela (2008) ....

If are directly quoting something out of the work, then your in-text citation would also include the page number (or paragraph number) of the quotation and would look  something like:

(Chadwick & Valenzuela, 2008, p. 29)

 

5. 4) How do I cite an article or chapter from an edited work using the APA format?

In your References follow this format.

Author(s) of article or chapter. (Year of publication). Title of article or chapter. In name of editors (Ed.), Title of work (pp. page numbers). City of publication: Publisher.

Example

Lockwood, A. (2000). Hospitality. In J. Jafari (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Tourism (pp. 284-286). New York: Routledge.

 

If you paraphrased the work your in-text citation could be something like:

(Lockwood, 2000)

or

Lockwood (2000) states that ....

If are directly quoting something out of the work, then your in-text citation would also include the page number (or paragraph number) of the quotation and would look  something like:

(Lockwood, 2000, p. 286)

6. 5) How do I create an APA or MLA citation for Films on Demand videos?

 When creating an APA citation for a Films on Demand video, first get the MLA citation by clicking on the video title to get the full title information, then in the Details tab on the bottom click on citations. MLA is the default citation. Use this information to create your APA citation (applying the rules of APA capitalization). There may be no authors. If not, begin with the title. This is the structure below: 


Author (year). Title [streaming video]. Retrieved Month day, year, from Films on Demand: URL

MLA Citation generated from Films on Demand  

Computers and cooling systems [Video file]. (2008). Retrieved January 11, 2017, from http://rpa.hollandcollege.com:2177/PortalPlaylists.aspx?wID=103580&xtid=38768 

APA Citation

Computers and cooling systems [streaming video]. (2008). Retrieved January11, 2017, from Films on Demand: https://rpa.hollandcollege.com:2177/PortalPlaylists.aspxwID=103580&xtid=38768

 **please note that you have to change http to https

7. 6) How do I cite a quotation within a quotation using the APA format?

Use single quotation marks within double quotation marks to indicate material quoted in a source text (quotation within a quotation). Cite the source in which you found the information - not the original work.

e.g.; The Guardian reported that the Farmers Helping Farmers "fundraiser was the second major project for Kristen Roe and the fundraising campaign called Women Making Waves that has grown up around her swims across the Northumberland Strait.  Roe States 'I think this is another tidal wave in the ripple effect of our campaign'" (Armstrong, 2008, p. A2).

8. 7) How do I cite a personal communication?

Personal Communications - letters, memos, lectures, email, interviews, and telephone conversations

Cite personal communications in text only. Provide initials and surname, and provide as exact a date as possible. Do not include personal communications in your References list.

  In text:

A. Smith also claimed that many of her students had difficulties with APA style (personal communication, January 4, 2009).

or (A. Smith, personal communication, January 4, 2009).  

9. 8) How do I cite a book using the APA format?

Typically you follow this format -

Author Lastname, Initials. (Date). Title of book in italics. Place of publication: Publisher.

You'll notice that the citation is double spaced, the title is in italics and only the first letter of the title is capitalized (unless it is a proper name).

Example with two authors:

Day, C. P. & Carlos, B. R. (2006). Knife skills for chefs. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.

10. 9) a. How do I reference an image? Image types are: Chart, Diagram, Illustration, Map, or Photograph

After the title insert the image type, change the title to the title of the Image, change  page to page of image

APA Style

Buggey, T. (2007). Storyboard for Ivan's morning routine. [Diagram]. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 9(3), 151. Retrieved December 14, 2007, from Academic Search Premier database.

MLA Style

Buggey,Tony. "Storyboard for Ivan's morning routine." [Diagram]. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, vol. 9, no. 3, 2007, p. 151. Academic Search Premier. Accessed 14 December 2007.

11. 9) b. What is plagiarism?

It's the act of passing off someone else's work as your own, as when you do a quick cut and paste from a web site into your own document, and neglect to give attribution to your sources. Plain and simple, it's a form of theft or cheating, and according to our Code of Conduct for Learners, plagiarism is an offence for which a student can be disciplined or exited from his or her program.

But it doesn't have to happen. To avoid charges of plagiarism, simply learn to document ("cite") your sources. Your learning manager may prescribe a particular style guide that sets out the "how-to" rules, or you may choose one that suits you and your subject area.

12. Can faculty and students copy from the Internet?

Yes educational institutions, teachers, and students may save, download, and share publicly available Internet materials, as well as use that material in the classroom and communicate it to students if they cite their source. Students and educators are required to cite the source of any Internet materials they use. 

“Publicly available” materials are those posted on-line by content creators and copyright owners without any technological protection measures, such as a password, encryption system, or similar  technology intended to limit access or distribution, and without a clearly visible notice prohibiting educational use.  

Routine classroom uses may be made of publicly available Internet materials, such as incorporating on-line text or images into homework assignments, performing music or plays on-line for  peers, exchanging materials with teachers or peers, or reposting a work on a restricted-access course Web site.

 

13. Videos to help with your research