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Soups Stocks Sauces and Regional and World Cuisine CCSP-2000

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Explore the basic physiology of the sense of taste and smell and gain an understanding of various flavor builders used by culinarians. Study the use of alcoholic beverages in cooking, their origin and production processes. Examine Regional and World Cuisines and their interplay with the food industry. Learn the classical origin of soups, stocks and sauces and their various category and sub-category classifications and derivatives.
Course Value: Session 2 Course 4 of Certified Culinary Scientist Preparation
Learning Manager/Instructor:
Joerg Soltermann
Phone: 902-894-6813
Email: jsoltermann@hollandcollege.com
Office: Rm. 813 Tourism and Culinary Centre
Culinary Institute of Canada
Holland College

Pre-requisite(s):
Culinary Arts Fundamentals CCSP-1000
Principles of Nutrition and Food Safety CCSP-1010
Fundamentals of Protein: Meat, Poultry, Fish, Shellfish and Other CCSP-1020

Co-requisites:
CCSP-2010 Pastry Fundamentals and Dairy Products
CCSP-2020 Principles of Vegetables Fruits and Farinaceous Products

Resources:

On Cooking: A Textbook of Culinary Fundamentals On Cooking Update Plus MyCulinaryLab with Pearson eText — Access Card Package, 5th Edition
Publisher: Pearson

On Cooking: A Textbook of Culinary Fundamentals (Labensky, Hause, Martel) Fifth edition update
Publisher: Pearson
Below are the links where you can order the book online:
Canadian Residents should go to http://www.mypearsonstore.ca/ ISBN 0133829170
US Residents should go to http://www.mypearsonstore.com/ ISBN 0133829170

Materials/Supplies/Technology: Pearson MyCulinaryLab online resource
Grade Scheme: 60%
Course Delivery Mode: Distance and face to face

Learning Outcomes and Competencies:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the flavor builders used in the kitchen.
    • Explain the psychology of taste and smell in humans.
    • Discuss factors affecting the perception of flavor.
    • Match the type of aroma/flavor with food characteristics.
    • Explain the concept of top, mid and base notes.
    • Describe factors that can affect flavor.
    • Recognize what can be added/subtracted from a basic taste profile (sweet, salty, etc.) to enhance perception of taste.
    • Define the basic taste sensations by describing how they are derived, how to enhance them and how tastes are perceived in various foods.
    • Discuss what human factors compromise the perception of taste.
    • Describe what environmental factors affect perception of taste.
    • Describe the physiology of how humans experience taste and smell.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of oil and spice extracts as flavor builders used in the kitchen.
    • Identify a variety of herbs, spices, oils, vinegars, wines, and other flavorings.
    • Explain proper storage conditions for flavoring agents.
    • Describe the properties of available culinary salts.
    • Describe the taste profiles of culinary oils.
    • Explain the difference between emulsions and extracts.
    • Explain the source of essential oils.
    • Describe proper storage for essential oils, extracts, etc.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of wines, beers and liquors and their use as flavor builders.
    • Define beer, wine, brandies, liquors, and liqueurs.
    • Discuss grape varietals.
    • Explain the wine making process and the process for evaluating wines.
    • Describe the difference between sparkling and fortified wines.
    • Explain labeling requirements for imported wines from various regions.
    • Identify guidelines to match wines and beer with food.
    • Explain possible challenges when using wine as a flavoring.
    • Describe the characteristics of different types of beer.
    • Identify the categories of liquors.
    • Explain the distillation process of major liquors.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of regional and world cuisines.
    • Describe various types of cuisine including global cuisine, national cuisine, regional cuisine, and ethnic cuisine.
    • Identify typical flavoring ingredients that are fundamental to various world cuisine.
    • Describe cooking methods that are fundamental to various world cuisine.
  5. Explain the construction of traditional stocks.
    • Define stock terminology including white, brown, fish, fumet, court bouillon and fond.
    • Identify the ratios of stock components including bones, mirepoix, seasonings, and water.
    • Identify the components and uses of various bones and how they relate to making stock.
    • Identify the steps in making various types of stocks.
    • Describe the method for safely cooling and handling stocks.
    • Explain key terms associated with stock making: sweat, deglaze, degrease, caramelize, mignon, remouillage, nage and glaze.
    • Describe how to troubleshoot common problems in stock making.
  6. Explain how to make the most commonly used sauces.
    • List the mother/leading sauces with their ingredients.
    • Describe how simple and compound sauces are made.
    • Define contemporary sauces including purees, salsas, relish, compound butters, coulis, vegetable juice sauces, flavored oils and pan sauces.
    • Describe the process of making a mother sauce.
    • Define “gastrique”, “clarify” and the various types of butter sauces.
    • Explain the usage of various sauce thickening agents including roux, cornstarch, beurre manie, liaison, emulsification, tempering and slurry.
    • Describe the proportions of roux to liquid for light, medium and heavy sauces.
    • Describe the process and related temperatures for holding emulsified butter sauces.
    • Explain sauce finishing techniques including reduction, straining and monte au beurre.
    • Describe various sauce qualities and uses including Béchamel, Veloute, Espagnole, Tomato, Hollandaise, butter sauces, pan gravy, coulis, salsa/relish and flavored oils.
    • Explain how to troubleshoot common problems in sauce making.
  7. Explain how to make traditional soups.
    • Identify the classifications of soups and their components including clear, consommé, cream, puree, bisques, chowders, and cold soups.
    • Describe the method used to produce the various types of soups.
    • Describe the types of thickening agents used for various types of soups.
    • Explain the function of soup garnishes and their application for various types of soup.
    • Describe the classic garnishes of classic consommés.

Course Delivery Plan
Week 1: Physiology of Human Taste, Flavor builders
Week 2: Beer Wine and Liqueur & International Cuisine
Week 3: Stocks
Week 4: Sauces
Week 5: Soups

Assessment Categories:
Discussion Forum: 10%
Assignments and Tests: 30%
Final Exam: 30%
Practicum: 30%

Assessment Plan:

Date Due

See Calendar

Assessment

Value

Assessment Category

TQA = Test, Quizzes and Assignments

Outcomes Assessed

Outlined week to week See SAM

 

Human Taste Quiz

11.1

TQA

Week 1

 

Flavoring Food Test

11.1

TQA

Week 1

 

Wine Beer& Liqueur

11.1

TQA

Week 2

 

International Cuisine

11.1

TQA

Week 2

 

Stock Quiz

11.1

TQA

Week 3

 

Sauce Assignment

11.1

TQA

Week 4

 

Sauce Quiz

11.1

TQA

Week 4

 

Soup Test

11.1

TQA

Week 5

 

Soup Assignment

11.1

TQA

Week 5

 

Discussion Forum

2

Forum

Week 1

 

Discussion Forum

2

Forum

Week 2

 

Discussion Forum

2

Forum

Week 3

 

Discussion Forum

2

Forum

Week 4

 

Discussion Forum

2

Forum

Week 5

 

Final Exam

30

Final Exam

Week 6

 

Practicum

30

Practicum

TBA

Institution/Department Policies:
Academic Dishonesty: Ethical behavior is expected throughout this course.
Attendance: Comply with discussion requirements. Must attend Face to Face practicum.
Accepting Student Work: All assignments must be submitted by posted due dates.
Lateness of/Missed Assignments/Tests: Late assignments will be accepted up to three additional days with a 10% reduction per day. Instructor must be informed if an assignment will be submitted late.

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